motorharp: line drawing of kid with glasses intently reading (Default)
Amd the answer is "no, I can't write two posts in under 1/2 hour."

Music
I saw SUUNS live and made a dork of myself at the merch table with one of the band members and bought vinyl. I can't stop listening to the SUUNS and Jerusalem In My Heart album. Speaking of vinyl, I got a cheap thrift store receiver and finally hooked up my sister's turntable. I blasted myself with old records and may have made my neighbor laugh while I belted out "Movin' Right Along" courtesy Kermit and Fozzie.

I worked on my album and got everything edited.

I went through a few weeks of My Harp Mastery and discovered "30 Days to Done", which helped my fine-tune my practice schedules.

I played a wedding outdoors on a campground at the coast and it was wonderful. I got to play some Battlestar Galactica music for it!

Books
I read "Unbroken" (despite writing it in my Christmas letter as "Broken") by Laura Hillenbrand. It was terrifying and hopeful. And read by Edward Herrmann, RIP.

I really liked "Darker Shade of Magic" by V.E. Schwab. The coat that you can take off and fold and turn inside out to turn it into a different coat folded and turned my mind inside out.

Movies/TV
Watching Jessica Jones, Grantchester, Luke Cage, and Westworld with friends has been a balm for my soul. I've also been watching the crap out of "The Mighty Boosh".

Seeing Lawrence of Arabia in 70mm was... wow, just wow. At the same theater, I saw Metropolis (1927) with live organ music.

Miscellaneous
My mom is recovering from her stroke. I trained for the next higher job classification. We did a TSD rally again. I made lost of socks.
motorharp: line drawing of kid with glasses intently reading (bookworm)
So, now we know why Ichabod will be staying in period clothing and where he gets them.  So clever and not just a little hilarious.

And now...
I'm currently working on finishing up the seventh item1 in my "sew one piece of clothing a week" collection... from October.  Things keep getting slipped into the queue as they have a higher priority.  Like resewing the buttons on my pants again because I'm either losing weight or they are stretching.

And putting gussets in the underarm seam of the sixth item - a basic short-sleeved button-up blouse1 - after completely finishing it, because it was one of those situations where the entire shirt comes up when you lift your arms.  Which is really the point of this post.

After reading Kathleen Fasanella's post about how sleeve cap ease is bogus and what a sleeve cap should look like to follow the actual shape of a person, I wanted to try drafting something like that on the next shirt I made to avoid the shirt-rising problem.

The seventh item is indeed a basic long-sleeved button-up blouse from the same pattern as the short-sleeved.  I took the gusset from the short-sleeved and marked the points where it starts and stops on the arm scye. It makes the bottom of the arm scye over 2" (5cm) higher! And it's not exactly parallel to the floor. It slopes slightly down toward the front.  Not quite as much as some of the pictures in the tailoring forums:armhole-cutter-and-tailor-5-5xBut like this:armhole

I can understand shaping the armhole opening, but the sleeve is beyond my understanding at this point.  Measuring my arm around the deltoids and comparing it to the pattern measurement makes me think I need to add about two inches more in width? Which sort of could correspond to this picture?
sleevecap_comparison

Anyway.

And then there are these which are lesser priority, but frustrating me to think about.

I had to cut myself out of my black and white skirt. Have you ever been able to un-jam an invisible zipper? And it really isn't as full as I originally wanted, so I want to add gores and a new zipper. Which means taking off the bottom black band and making a new one of those.  And I could probably line it this time instead of underlining it. Basically, I would like to make an entirely new skirt. Urg.

The black dress I made from a pattern I thought fit me is exceptionally tight because the waist is too high and I should have lined it, not interlined it.  The corduroy and rayon lining really need to move independently.  Which means, basically, making a whole new dress.  And taking the collar off because it looks a little too... churchy?  Wednesday Addams?

1 From fabric bought for me while visiting home. :)
motorharp: line drawing of kid with glasses intently reading (bookworm)
I was really skeptical of this show when first hearing about it. I thought, "Really, how far can they stretch this out? And with what?" The pilot didn't dissuade my hesitance, despite having Clancy Brown, Orlando Jones, and John Cho in it.  The next episodes didn't either, however I loved the chemistry between Ichabod and Abbie, not the mention the potential for a very fascinating backstory for Abbie, and the costumes were amazing, so I kept watching.  Then there was the exchange between Crane and the NorthStar operator which is worth repeated watchings and just worth it alone. I was officially hooked.

And the costumes!

The costume designer, Kristin M. Burke, runs a blog called frock talk1, and answers questions about the show. When she gets time, that is, because she's incredibly busy (yay!).

Ichabod's Revolutionary War regimental coat satisfies my need for buttons, and I just noticed there are some on his pants.

SleepyHollowCoat
sleepy-hollow-coat-pants
A quick pattern search for the 1700s turns up a few patterns that show these are really typical of the time.

I hope this is going to be a trend that starts showing up in RTW, because I love the look.  A surreptitious interpretation?:

Prada went back - not quite as far back as the Revolutionary War - for their Fall 2012 men's collections, which I loved. Maybe influenced more by Downton Abbey?

Prada-mens-fall-2012
Yes, that is Gary Oldman. Willem Dafoe modeled also. *sigh*

I hope the modernizing old styles is a thing and continues.


I still don't know how Sleepy Hollow is going to keep the plot going, though, but I don't care, I just want more.



1 Her discussions of Beetlejuice so mirrored my own experience, which is a whole other story, and clearly we need to be best friends.
motorharp: line drawing of kid with glasses intently reading (bookworm)
The Murdoch Mysteries series originally started out life as books written by Maureen Jennings about a detective with the Toronto constabulary in the late 1890s.  It was then made into a TV mini-series, and finally into a regular series.  As with all book/TV/movie adaptations, they diverge into different directions. Jennings is still writing the books - she started the series in 1997, and the show is currently in it's 6th season.

As I said in my goodreads review, I like the book pretty well, and like the forensics aspect of the TV shows.  The best aspect, of course, for me, is all the period costumes and sets.  There are a few good behind-the scenes pictures in a slide show attached to this news article.

My absolute favorite is Inspector Brackenried played by Thomas Craig.  In talking about the details he designs into the clothing, costume designer Alex Reda says about Brackenreid's waistcoats that he doesn't necessarily have them fit perfectly. He makes them tight and some of them double breasted so the buttons tend to strain and he ends up looking more barrel-chested. He's really "average-sized and quite fit" and you can see the difference in the photos. It really suits his blustering character.

murdoch2Normal sized
murdoch1
Super sized!





I've also definitely seen bra lines and not corset lines on one of the characters, which I totally get because wearing a corset all day could be... wearing.  But I'm also annoyed that I notice things like that. And get annoyed about them.

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